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Blue-Tongue Skinks - Tiliqua sp Blue-Tongue Skinks - Tiliqua sp

 Equipment for a Blue Tongue

 

Vivarium: VX36 for an adult in Beech, Oak, Walnut.

Lights: For the VX36 1 x Arcadia ADCH Reptile ceramic lamp holder & bracket. With PT-2133 Sun Glo basking spot lamp

100watt and PT-2189. Arcadia ACR 18 controller and Repti Glo 5 20w (24”) Tube.

 

Heating: As above and use a Royce Heat Mat 16”x12” .Place under the basking area and leave running 24/7 on a mat stat thermostat set at 75F. This gives some background heating for nigh time.

Two thermometers PT-2465 place one at each end to show the cool temperature and hot end temperatures to indicate that there is a heat gradient.

Décor: Use a PT-2803 Exo Terra Water Dish Large. The water bowl should be kept at the cool end to avoid excessive humidity. Use a PT-2813 Exo Terra Feeding Dish X Large for more than one Blue Tongue and a PT-2811 Exo Terra Feeding Dish Medium for one. Use the bowl to feed their greens and vegetables. Use a large piece of Cork bark tube as a hide out or a PT-2852 hideout cave for a baby Blue Tongues to sleep in. Bog wood and drift wood are good. A large basking rock such as a large piece of sandstone placed under the basking spot light is a good addition. This holds the heat and helps them to digest the food properly. Artificial plants. PT-3000-3052 these are just for decoration and make the vivarium looks more natural. Choose a selection of plants and vines to give your Vivarium that finished look.

Substrate: Orchid Bark, Beech Chips or Aspen.

 

Calcium and vitamins: Exo-Terra Calcium +D3. Exo-Terra Multi Vitamin Powder.

Many reptiles require a diet based on live or fresh foods, due to their specific feeding habits. These are readily available, but in themselves do not offer a balanced supply of nutrients. To ensure your pet receives a properly balanced diet, it is important to increase the nutrient content of these foods with a nutrient supplement.

 


 
CARE
 
 
NATIVE TO:
Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea. The different species found variously in open woodlands, at the margins of forest and field, semi-deserts. They are heavily built, with broad bodies set on small legs with delicate toes. The broad, blunt triangular head typical of skinks. They get their common name from the deep, berry blue tongue vividly offset against the deep pink interior of their mouth.
 
SPECIES:
T. occipitalis - Western Blue Tongued Skink
Likes dry habitats, compact animal with short tail-growing to 50 cm. / 19.5 in. Compact with short tail; reddish brown with light cross banding. Likes berries and spiders. Produces 5-10 live young.
T. scincoides - Common/Eastern Blue-Tongued Skink
Likes semi-desert to agricultural areas. Grows to 60 cm. /23.5 in. (average 45 cm. /17.5 in.). May be different subspecies since external differences are noted. Feeds on small animals, plant material. Often found in suburban gardens. Hardy in captivity. Averages 6-12 live young.
T. s. intermedia - Northern Blue Tongued Skink
Likes tropical/savannah woodlands -growing to 60 cm. /23.5 in. Produces 5-20 live young. The best choice for handable pets.
T. nigrolutea - Blotched Blue Tongued Skink
Also known as Black and Yellow Blue-tongued. Southern Australia and Tasmania. Brown/black with yellowish, irregularly spotted and striped pattern. Grows to 60 cm. /23.5 in. Omnivorous. Produces 4-10 live young. Often crosses with T. scincoides, offspring are not sterile.
T. s. mustifaciata - Central Blue-Tongued Skink
Found in desert and tropical environments. Grows to 40-45 cm./15.5-17.5 in., feeds on wildflowers, small vertebrates, and insects. Produces 2-5 live young.
T. s. gigas - New Guinea Blue Tongue Skink - This skink is gray or gray brown with irregular narrow bands of dark brown across the back.
T. gerrandii - Australian PINK tongued skink
Found in New South Wales, Eastern Australia. Grows to 40-45 cm. / 15.5-17.5 in. This skink lives in a wetter forest habitat than the other Australian Skinks, is nocturnal in warm weather and diurnal in cold and feeds almost exclusively on snails and slugs. Produces 12-25 live young in summer.
Housing:
Hatchlings can be kept in 24” vivarium and adults require at least 36” vivarium. Substrate can be aspen shavings or Beech Chippings play pen sand for adults. For youngsters to yearlings the best substrate is newspaper or kitchen roll paper to guard against impaction. They will require a hide box to sleep in and as a moist box when shedding. They are ground dwellers and so do not need tall branches or rocks for climbing. They CAN climb; however, so top-opening tanks do need to be securely fastened. One area of slightly damp substrate should be kept, or a humidity retreat box (into which they can freely climb in and out, filled with damp sphagnum moss, for use during shedding periods).
Water:
They should have a bowl of water available at all times. They may defecate in it so it should be checked regularly. The water bowl should be big enough for them to climb easily in and out of as it will be used for bathing as well as drinking.
Light:
Regular exposure to UVB wavelengths is strongly recommended. This can be furnished by close proximity to an Exo Terra UV fluorescent light. They do not tolerate very high temperatures and can easily become prostrate by the build-up of heat in their enclosure.
Temperature:
The overall gradient should range from the mid 70s on the cool side to the mid 80s on the warm side. A slightly warmer basking area, with temps into the low 90s, may also be provided during the day. A Heat mat I the vivarium  at one end, and a radiant heat source overhead at the same end, will generally be all that is required to establish the gradient. Cold winter weather may require additional heating or a stronger bulb if the room is a cold one. Temps should not be allowed to fall below 70° F at night on the cool side.
Diet:
Blue-tongue skinks are omnivores, consuming both plant and animal matter. Their diet should be 60% plant, 40% animal. Frozen mixed vegetables (carrots and peas mixture) can be ground in a food process and a calcium supplement added. This can be refrozen in serving sized blocks, or kept refrigerated for a week. Serve with a LOW FAT canned dog food. Mealworms and pre killed baby mice (larger mice for adults) should be offered. A slightly more time consuming but very nutritious vegetable salad is 1/2 cup shredded raw green beans, 1/2 cup shredded winter or summer squash (not zucchini) or carrots, 1/2 cup shredded raw parsnip, and 1/4 cup fruit.
Their favourite food are snails, if you feed them snails from the garden make sure they have not come into contact with slug pellets or slug bait. I keep slugs for a week in boxes and feed with bramble leaves before feeding them.
Handling:
Blue-tongue skinks are very docile, curious lizards. They tame easily and are handleable by small children. They do develop claws, and while they do not particularly scratch, it can be startling and scary to someone who is nervous holding them, so always supervise people closely when first handing the lizard to them. Like many omnivorous and carnivorous lizards, blue-tongues find that wriggling human fingers look an awful lot like small wriggling mice...and may try to eat one if they are hungry. As with all such reptiles, it is best to wash your hands before handling them if you have been handling anything they normally eat.
 

 

 

Lights: For the VX36 1 x Arcadia ADCH Reptile ceramic lamp holder & bracket. With PT-2133 Sun Glo basking spot lamp

100watt and PT-2189. Arcadia ACR 18 controller and Repti Glo 5 20w (24”) Tube.

 

Heating: As above and use a Royce Heat Mat 16”x12” .Place under the basking area and leave running 24/7 on a mat stat thermostat set at 75F. This gives some background heating for nigh time.

Two thermometers PT-2465 place one at each end to show the cool temperature and hot end temperatures to indicate that there is a heat gradient.

 

Décor: Use a PT-2803 Exo Terra Water Dish Large. The water bowl should be kept at the cool end to avoid excessive humidity. Use a PT-2813 Exo Terra Feeding Dish X Large for more than one Blue Tongue and a PT-2811 Exo Terra Feeding Dish Medium for one. Use the bowl to feed their greens and vegetables. Use a large piece of Cork bark tube as a hide out or a PT-2852 hideout cave for a baby Blue Tongues to sleep in. Bog wood and drift wood are good. A large basking rock such as a large piece of sandstone placed under the basking spot light is a good addition. This holds the heat and helps them to digest the food properly. Artificial plants. PT-3000-3052 these are just for decoration and make the vivarium looks more natural. Choose a selection of plants and vines to give your Vivarium that finished look.

 

Substrate: Orchid Bark, Beech Chips or Aspen.

 

 

Vivarium: VX36 for an adult in Beech, Oak, Walnut. 

 

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